Rapid ʻŌhiʻa Death

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ʻOhia mai ā pau pono nā ʻike kumu o Hawaiʻi – gather up every bit of the basic knowledge of Hawaiʻi.

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Hawai’i’s beloved ʻōhiʻa lehua trees are under attack by a fungal disease that has been spreading throughout south east Hawai’i .  It has the potential to kill the trees statewide.

We have many of the trees growing on our property.  We have both the common red blossom tree and the rare yellow blossom tree.  Already, thousands of acres of the trees have died, and there doesn’t seem to be nothing to stop the spread of the fungus.

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The University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources has some useful information about what the fungus is and how to prevent the spread.  Called Ceratocystis wilt, the university has plotted a map where the fungus has spread.

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The ʻōhiʻa lehua trees are native only to Hawai’i and must be protected.  So far, our trees have been spared, but I fear it’s only a matter of time before the fungus reaches our trees.

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I took this Arial photo of the  ʻōhiʻa forest in my neighborhood.  You can see where the lush green is being replaced with a grayish brown color.  It will be very sad should the forest die and we lose another indigenous species to the islands.

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Arrivals And Departures

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Arrivals and departures at the Hilo airport is a daily occurrence.  The busy little airport is a hub of tourism and cargo transportation.  One of the pleasant, and attractive features, about Hilo airport is its local feel and character.  Originally known as “General Lyman Field“, the airport was renamed as Hilo International Airport after the Hawai’i department of transportation took it over the operations.

The airport is nestled along the Waiakea and Keaukaha Hawaiian homelands in south Hilo.  The airport is small enough to handle large traffic, yet small enough to preserve that small town feel.  No large presence of most major airports like Honolulu, with long lines and crowded terminals.  Departure terminals are open air waiting areas free from hanging televisions broadcasting 24 hour news stories.  It’s quiet and reflective, roomy and comfortable.  It keeps that small town feel found nowhere else but in Hawai’i’s second largest city.

From Hilo Bay, you can watch arrival and departure flights while casting a fishing line into the bay.  From the flight you can view the landscapes of east Hawai’i coastline.   Revealing small town villages, water falls, surfing shorelines and rocky cliffs.

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What I love about Moku o Keawe (The Big Island) is the ruralness.  East Hawai’i island is still very much country life with sprawling farms and vast landscapes of empty country side.  If you’re looking for night-life and big city life, you won’t find it here.  Crowded highways and stacked apartment skyscrapers don’t exist here.  You can witness a night sky crowded with stars, and the outline of the Milky Way.  You can get lost watching the waves roll in from the shore line.  You can find quiet places here just to reflect.  It’s the biggest small town life you cannot find elsewhere.  Lucky you live Hawai’i.

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E Komo Mai

 

 

 

 

 

Gathering Harvest

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The Beautiful Harvest

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Harvest time arrives to a bounty of plenty this year.  We’ve had lots of rain this year and that has promoted a great growing season.  It’s like having a backyard grocery store.  With the high cost of food, growing your own fruits and vegetables is a cost savings alternative.  Much of our produce, meats  and packaged products are shipped in from the mainland.  That adds to the cost of living.  So you learn to live locally, and grow locally.

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